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« Nice NYT piece on dangers of inequality inside China | Main | Aren't all those Islamists now in power supposed to keep globalization out? »
11:15AM

WPR Briefing: Trans-Atlantic Ties Still Key to Renewing U.S. Global Leadership

For roughly a decade now, I’ve been advocating that America needs to be unsentimental in choosing its military allies for the 21st century. Europe and Japan are aging and seem increasingly less willing to protect their interests abroad, while India and China are becoming budding superpowers with global interests that, to a stunning degree, overlap with America’s. Most pointedly, we live in an age of “frontier integration” triggered by globalization’s rapid advance, a process in which China and India, and not the “old” West, are the two rising pillars. So it makes sense for America to focus future alliance-building efforts in their direction.

Read the entire article at World Politics Review.


Reader Comments (4)

Bravo again. Keep going Tom...WAR is evil either HOT OR COLD! I agree we should continue to seek new partners especially the largest. I have always appreciated your CIA strategic thrust. What a glorious way to perpetuate peace, our ultimate objective. Hopefully your next book will emerge in time to inspire & influence the 2016 presidential election.

February 8, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterElmer Humes

Bravo! Your recent posts have been spot on! Very glad to see you back to blogging five days a week. After reading this last WPR, I've come to the following conclusion: Mexico will be the 52nd state. The 51st will be Great Britain....

February 9, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterMH

The Russian bear is wearing a $50,000 watch and driving a stolen Mercedes. He has a good looking babe on his arm and likes to go "clubbing." The Europeans are not afraid of him anymore. Therefore they don't need us. They formed their "union" to compete with us and beat up on the dollar. Aside from stories about great grandpa's village in (name the country) we have no close ties to that part of the world anymore.

India and China have been bleeding people to the US for decades. Some Americans keep complaining about our country but lots of folks still think it is the greatest place on earth.

Pakistan is a problem. It is unstable. Has India on edge. Nuclear weapons in both country's arsenals. China seems to lean towards Pakistan. That situation needs to be stabilized.

I was shocked to see Paneta warning everyone that cuts in military spending could damage the economy...as if there is no other way to spend money...no other way to employ people. We are being lied to and misled. Oh, and by the way another 4 star walks out of the military and into a high paying job in US industry. Nice.

February 9, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterTed O'Connor

"But what Europe and America can do together is to lead by example on efforts such as taming capital markets, shifting off oil to natural gas and renewable energy, and recasting retirement and its cost structures, among others. Such a Progressive Era 2.0 would be far more globally beneficial than the tragically antiquated logic of President Barack Obama’s “strategic pivot” to Asia. The West doesn’t need to “box in” China, or enlist India in that fool’s errand. Instead, it needs to show China and India and the rest of the South’s future rising pillars how to go about taming modern globalization."

Sounds like a good transatlantic programme. Europe is willing to do so--but is the USA and Great Britian willing to tame Wall Street and the City of London? And what about the Transatlantic Freetrade Area proposed by Biden, Merkel and Westerwelle?

February 12, 2013 | Unregistered CommenterRalf Ostner

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